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The future of Little Printer

littleprinterblog:

We, at Berg, have some sad news which will affect your Little Printer.

Berg is wrapping up its activities. We might be back one day, but right now we have to go into hibernation. (See the Berg blog for more.)

It’s simple to wrap up most of our activities (like our design consultancy for…

Well, fuck.

"And on Cyprus there is a statue of her [Venus] bearded, with the body and clothes of a woman, with the scepter and organs of a man, and they consider her both male and female. Aristophanes calls her Aphroditos (Ἀφρόδιτος). Laevius too says as follows:

worshiping then the nurturing [almus] Venus
whether [s/he] is female or male,
just as the Night-Shiner is nurturing [alma].

Philochorus too in his Atthis affirms that she is the moon and that men make sacrifice to her in women’s clothing, women in men’s, because she is reckoned both male and female.”

(via Myth Happens - I’m a boy, I’m a girl, I’m a boy, I’m a girl, I’m a boy, I’m a girl, I’m a boy, I’m a girl)

"And on Cyprus there is a statue of her [Venus] bearded, with the body and clothes of a woman, with the scepter and organs of a man, and they consider her both male and female. Aristophanes calls her Aphroditos (Ἀφρόδιτος). Laevius too says as follows:

worshiping then the nurturing [almus] Venus
whether [s/he] is female or male,
just as the Night-Shiner is nurturing [alma].

Philochorus too in his Atthis affirms that she is the moon and that men make sacrifice to her in women’s clothing, women in men’s, because she is reckoned both male and female.”

(via Myth Happens - I’m a boy, I’m a girl, I’m a boy, I’m a girl, I’m a boy, I’m a girl, I’m a boy, I’m a girl)

Author Scott Lynch responds to a critic of the character Zamira Drakasha, a black woman pirate in his fantasy book Red Seas Under Red Skies, the second novel of the Gentleman Bastard series.

fuckyeahscifiwomenofcolour:

The bolded sections represent quotes from the criticism he received. All the z-snaps are in order.

Your characters are unrealistic stereotpyes of political correctness. Is it really necessary for the sake of popular sensibilities to have in a fantasy what…

(Source: scott-lynch.livejournal.com)

Author Scott Lynch responds to a critic of the character Zamira Drakasha, a black woman pirate in his fantasy book Red Seas Under Red Skies, the second novel of the Gentleman Bastard series.

fuckyeahscifiwomenofcolour:

The bolded sections represent quotes from the criticism he received. All the z-snaps are in order.

Your characters are unrealistic stereotpyes of political correctness. Is it really necessary for the sake of popular sensibilities to have in a fantasy what we have in the real world? I read…

(Source: scott-lynch.livejournal.com)

If gay men fail to fight for more vulnerable members of the LGBT community, it will be all of our undoing. We have to care and fight for issues that aren’t directly about us. That is community. That is what it means for the letters “LGBT” to be spoken of as cohesive unit.
There is a gap between victories relevant to the lives of gay men and the rest of the LGBT community, and it is threatening to become a chasm. Ask a white gay man living in West Hollywood, a latino transgender man in Albuquerque, and a black lesbian in Dallas the same question: “Does America love you yet?”
I don’t have enough perspective to speculate on the nature of the web, so I’m going to be myopic on purpose: What if it’s nature is to be impermanent, and that is its strength, and what allows it to evolve rapidly? I’ve worked hard to ensure that The Julius Cards will be around for a long time, but what if that’s unnatural? Anecdotally, one of my favorite things ever written is only available through the mirror at archive.org because the author’s family allowed her domain to expire when she died. When I die in a plane crash (because that is how I want to die), who will keep the servers running? Who will keep this thing alive for the length of time I intended for it to be alive for?
if you read the accounts of people who rode steam trains for the first time, for instance, they went a little crazy. They’d traveled fifteen miles an hour, and when they were writing the accounts afterward they struggled to describe that unthinkable speed and what this linear velocity does to a perspective as you’re looking forward. There was even a Victorian medical complaint called “railway spine.”
it’s interesting to consider what made this study “human subjects research” in the first place. You might think that the Facebook study was “research” because it experimented on human beings. This is not the case. Facebook, along with Google and countless other websites, is constantly experimenting on you by systematically varying aspects of their formats and contents to determine what will best elicit your pageviews and clicks. So long as these experiments are solely for their private corporate use and are never published, these experiments do not constitute regulated human subjects research. It is only because Facebook published this work and was transparent about what it was doing — at least compared to standard corporate practice — that it was regulated. The fact is that our norms for scientific research that will be published are far stricter than those for corporate research that will not be published. You are not alone if this strikes you as nonsensical.

The future of Little Printer

littleprinterblog:

We, at Berg, have some sad news which will affect your Little Printer.

Berg is wrapping up its activities. We might be back one day, but right now we have to go into hibernation. (See the Berg blog for more.)

It’s simple to wrap up most of our activities (like our design consultancy for…

Well, fuck.

"And on Cyprus there is a statue of her [Venus] bearded, with the body and clothes of a woman, with the scepter and organs of a man, and they consider her both male and female. Aristophanes calls her Aphroditos (Ἀφρόδιτος). Laevius too says as follows:

worshiping then the nurturing [almus] Venus
whether [s/he] is female or male,
just as the Night-Shiner is nurturing [alma].

Philochorus too in his Atthis affirms that she is the moon and that men make sacrifice to her in women’s clothing, women in men’s, because she is reckoned both male and female.”

(via Myth Happens - I’m a boy, I’m a girl, I’m a boy, I’m a girl, I’m a boy, I’m a girl, I’m a boy, I’m a girl)

"And on Cyprus there is a statue of her [Venus] bearded, with the body and clothes of a woman, with the scepter and organs of a man, and they consider her both male and female. Aristophanes calls her Aphroditos (Ἀφρόδιτος). Laevius too says as follows:

worshiping then the nurturing [almus] Venus
whether [s/he] is female or male,
just as the Night-Shiner is nurturing [alma].

Philochorus too in his Atthis affirms that she is the moon and that men make sacrifice to her in women’s clothing, women in men’s, because she is reckoned both male and female.”

(via Myth Happens - I’m a boy, I’m a girl, I’m a boy, I’m a girl, I’m a boy, I’m a girl, I’m a boy, I’m a girl)

Author Scott Lynch responds to a critic of the character Zamira Drakasha, a black woman pirate in his fantasy book Red Seas Under Red Skies, the second novel of the Gentleman Bastard series.

fuckyeahscifiwomenofcolour:

The bolded sections represent quotes from the criticism he received. All the z-snaps are in order.

Your characters are unrealistic stereotpyes of political correctness. Is it really necessary for the sake of popular sensibilities to have in a fantasy what…

(Source: scott-lynch.livejournal.com)

Author Scott Lynch responds to a critic of the character Zamira Drakasha, a black woman pirate in his fantasy book Red Seas Under Red Skies, the second novel of the Gentleman Bastard series.

fuckyeahscifiwomenofcolour:

The bolded sections represent quotes from the criticism he received. All the z-snaps are in order.

Your characters are unrealistic stereotpyes of political correctness. Is it really necessary for the sake of popular sensibilities to have in a fantasy what we have in the real world? I read…

(Source: scott-lynch.livejournal.com)

If gay men fail to fight for more vulnerable members of the LGBT community, it will be all of our undoing. We have to care and fight for issues that aren’t directly about us. That is community. That is what it means for the letters “LGBT” to be spoken of as cohesive unit.
There is a gap between victories relevant to the lives of gay men and the rest of the LGBT community, and it is threatening to become a chasm. Ask a white gay man living in West Hollywood, a latino transgender man in Albuquerque, and a black lesbian in Dallas the same question: “Does America love you yet?”
I don’t have enough perspective to speculate on the nature of the web, so I’m going to be myopic on purpose: What if it’s nature is to be impermanent, and that is its strength, and what allows it to evolve rapidly? I’ve worked hard to ensure that The Julius Cards will be around for a long time, but what if that’s unnatural? Anecdotally, one of my favorite things ever written is only available through the mirror at archive.org because the author’s family allowed her domain to expire when she died. When I die in a plane crash (because that is how I want to die), who will keep the servers running? Who will keep this thing alive for the length of time I intended for it to be alive for?
if you read the accounts of people who rode steam trains for the first time, for instance, they went a little crazy. They’d traveled fifteen miles an hour, and when they were writing the accounts afterward they struggled to describe that unthinkable speed and what this linear velocity does to a perspective as you’re looking forward. There was even a Victorian medical complaint called “railway spine.”

(Source: youtube.com)

it’s interesting to consider what made this study “human subjects research” in the first place. You might think that the Facebook study was “research” because it experimented on human beings. This is not the case. Facebook, along with Google and countless other websites, is constantly experimenting on you by systematically varying aspects of their formats and contents to determine what will best elicit your pageviews and clicks. So long as these experiments are solely for their private corporate use and are never published, these experiments do not constitute regulated human subjects research. It is only because Facebook published this work and was transparent about what it was doing — at least compared to standard corporate practice — that it was regulated. The fact is that our norms for scientific research that will be published are far stricter than those for corporate research that will not be published. You are not alone if this strikes you as nonsensical.
"If gay men fail to fight for more vulnerable members of the LGBT community, it will be all of our undoing. We have to care and fight for issues that aren’t directly about us. That is community. That is what it means for the letters “LGBT” to be spoken of as cohesive unit."
"There is a gap between victories relevant to the lives of gay men and the rest of the LGBT community, and it is threatening to become a chasm. Ask a white gay man living in West Hollywood, a latino transgender man in Albuquerque, and a black lesbian in Dallas the same question: “Does America love you yet?”"
"I don’t have enough perspective to speculate on the nature of the web, so I’m going to be myopic on purpose: What if it’s nature is to be impermanent, and that is its strength, and what allows it to evolve rapidly? I’ve worked hard to ensure that The Julius Cards will be around for a long time, but what if that’s unnatural? Anecdotally, one of my favorite things ever written is only available through the mirror at archive.org because the author’s family allowed her domain to expire when she died. When I die in a plane crash (because that is how I want to die), who will keep the servers running? Who will keep this thing alive for the length of time I intended for it to be alive for?"
"if you read the accounts of people who rode steam trains for the first time, for instance, they went a little crazy. They’d traveled fifteen miles an hour, and when they were writing the accounts afterward they struggled to describe that unthinkable speed and what this linear velocity does to a perspective as you’re looking forward. There was even a Victorian medical complaint called “railway spine.”"
"it’s interesting to consider what made this study “human subjects research” in the first place. You might think that the Facebook study was “research” because it experimented on human beings. This is not the case. Facebook, along with Google and countless other websites, is constantly experimenting on you by systematically varying aspects of their formats and contents to determine what will best elicit your pageviews and clicks. So long as these experiments are solely for their private corporate use and are never published, these experiments do not constitute regulated human subjects research. It is only because Facebook published this work and was transparent about what it was doing — at least compared to standard corporate practice — that it was regulated. The fact is that our norms for scientific research that will be published are far stricter than those for corporate research that will not be published. You are not alone if this strikes you as nonsensical."

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